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Andrew Vermeesch, Michigan Farm Bureau

Michigan Farm Bureau wants to increase the number of farmers serving in government 20% by 2022. This is part of a series of articles aimed at informing Farm Bureau members about elected and appointed positions that offer opportunities for representing agriculture in government.

Michigan agriculture relies on a strong transportation system to get products to and from market. Whether by truck, rail, plane or boat, each mode of transportation plays a part keeping Michigan farmers moving forward. But out of all the vital infrastructure agriculture needs, nothing compares to the importance of our local roads. This should come as no surprise because almost all products, whether coming or going, starts or ends on a county road leading to the farm.

Locally driven is the key principle behind managing Michigan’s local road network. Our Road Commission Act of 1909 established county-level boards empowered with local control over roads while also allowing for regional collaboration.

County road commissions are responsible for ensuring safe and efficient transportation for goods and people over local roads and bridges within their jurisdiction. They’re composed of three to five members who are either appointed by the county board of commissioners or elected by voters. Road commissioners are usually paid a per-meeting stipend and serve six-year terms, staggered so not all them are up for election or appointment at the same time.

Farmers are great candidates for road commission service because of their on-farm skills and practical experience in areas such as long-term planning and cost-effective equipment maintenance.

Ogemaw County dairy farmer Klint Marshall milks cows near Lupton and knows firsthand the importance of agriculture’s involvement, being two years into his first term on the Ogemaw Road Commission.

“Agriculture is a small part of the overall population, but in our area farming is very prevalent — primarily dairy. It’s important that the industry is part of the dialogue and that agriculture is represented,” he said. “Revenue generated by farming recirculates four to six times in the community before it leaves, whether that’s through paychecks to farm employees or for parts at the local parts store. Being on the road commission allows me to bring that knowledge to other road commissioners.”

As a dairy farmer, Marshall understands the urgency of certain projects and incorporates agriculture’s unique brand of common sense to road commission decisions.

“For example, grading a road is much like doing field work,” he said. “Just like there’s a right time to do tillage work, there’s a right time to grade a road. Too dry and the grader just creates dust; too wet and the road becomes mud. Having the right moisture in the ground, just like field work, makes a big difference.”

While managing financial operations is a foremost responsibility of road commissions, equally important is maintaining strong relationships with townships and other local communities, especially when it comes to road maintenance and improvements.

“Everything starts at the local level and it’s important to have good working relationships with townships so they can provide input and help in the decision-making process,” Marshall said. “Good relationships help alleviate issues as they come up with other farmers, whether it’s mud and debris coming off farm equipment or drainage issues from a road that impacts a farmer’s field.”

Farmers need local roads. Shouldn’t they be involved in decisions about maintaining and improving local roads and bridges? Serving on your county road commission is your opportunity to do just that.

Michigan Farm Bureau wants to increase the number of farmers serving in government 20% by 2022.

County News

Andrew Vermeesch, Michigan Farm Bureau

Michigan Farm Bureau wants to increase the number of farmers serving in government 20% by 2022. This is part of a series of articles aimed at informing Farm Bureau members about elected and appointed positions that offer opportunities for representing agriculture in government.

Michigan agriculture relies on a strong transportation system to get products to and from market. Whether by truck, rail, plane or boat, each mode of transportation plays a part keeping Michigan farmers moving forward. But out of all the vital infrastructure agriculture needs, nothing compares to the importance of our local roads. This should come as no surprise because almost all products, whether coming or going, starts or ends on a county road leading to the farm.

Locally driven is the key principle behind managing Michigan’s local road network. Our Road Commission Act of 1909 established county-level boards empowered with local control over roads while also allowing for regional collaboration.

County road commissions are responsible for ensuring safe and efficient transportation for goods and people over local roads and bridges within their jurisdiction. They’re composed of three to five members who are either appointed by the county board of commissioners or elected by voters. Road commissioners are usually paid a per-meeting stipend and serve six-year terms, staggered so not all them are up for election or appointment at the same time.

Farmers are great candidates for road commission service because of their on-farm skills and practical experience in areas such as long-term planning and cost-effective equipment maintenance.

Ogemaw County dairy farmer Klint Marshall milks cows near Lupton and knows firsthand the importance of agriculture’s involvement, being two years into his first term on the Ogemaw Road Commission.

“Agriculture is a small part of the overall population, but in our area farming is very prevalent — primarily dairy. It’s important that the industry is part of the dialogue and that agriculture is represented,” he said. “Revenue generated by farming recirculates four to six times in the community before it leaves, whether that’s through paychecks to farm employees or for parts at the local parts store. Being on the road commission allows me to bring that knowledge to other road commissioners.”

As a dairy farmer, Marshall understands the urgency of certain projects and incorporates agriculture’s unique brand of common sense to road commission decisions.

“For example, grading a road is much like doing field work,” he said. “Just like there’s a right time to do tillage work, there’s a right time to grade a road. Too dry and the grader just creates dust; too wet and the road becomes mud. Having the right moisture in the ground, just like field work, makes a big difference.”

While managing financial operations is a foremost responsibility of road commissions, equally important is maintaining strong relationships with townships and other local communities, especially when it comes to road maintenance and improvements.

“Everything starts at the local level and it’s important to have good working relationships with townships so they can provide input and help in the decision-making process,” Marshall said. “Good relationships help alleviate issues as they come up with other farmers, whether it’s mud and debris coming off farm equipment or drainage issues from a road that impacts a farmer’s field.”

Farmers need local roads. Shouldn’t they be involved in decisions about maintaining and improving local roads and bridges? Serving on your county road commission is your opportunity to do just that.

Michigan Farm Bureau wants to increase the number of farmers serving in government 20% by 2022.

Michigan Farm Bureau asks members and agricultural stakeholders to send a message to Gov. Whitmer, asking her to issue a clarification to Executive Order 2020-21, deeming the retail sale of plants as essential infrastructure. To act, simply text the phrase MIGREEN to the number 52886 or visit https://bit.ly/sayyestoplantsales.

CLICK HERE TO TAKE ACTION!

Retail garden centers and greenhouses across the state are brimming with nursery stock, flowers and vegetable plants — ready for customers to purchase for their home garden and landscaping needs.

Unfortunately, unlike much of the food and agriculture sector, retail garden centers were not deemed essential to operate under Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” Executive Order 2020-21.

In response to grower concern, Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) President Carl Bednarski on April 3 sent a formal request to Whitmer to “ask for a reconsideration of retail garden centers to be included as essential infrastructure workers.”

According to MFB’s horticulture specialist, Audrey Sebolt, the industry with estimated retail value of $580 to $700 million, and 9,000-plus employees, has much at stake.

“For many growers, if they’re not allowed to sell the plants already growing in greenhouses, it will mean a complete loss and an entire year without income for both the owners and their employees,” Sebolt said. “We’re hopeful Governor Whitmer will take the lead from Ohio Governor DeWine who on April 2 designated retail garden centers as essential infrastructure.”

Bednarski’s request to Whitmer also indicates the industry is “willing to comply with increased reasonable restrictions to provide for social distancing, such as curbside delivery,” so they can sell product.

Many studies have shown mental health benefits from being able to plant flowers, curate landscaping or grow vegetables.

“As Michigan residents deal with direct or indirect impacts of Coronavirus on their lives, many like to turn to gardening to cope with stress, no different than those who turn to puzzles, reading or music for similar benefits,” Sebolt added. “Because of Coronavirus, there has been a large increase in sales of vegetable plants to home owners occurring in southern states. and we’re expecting this to occur in Michigan too.

“Our growers simply would like to be able to get their product into the hands of those who need it.”

Michigan Farm Bureau and Michigan Farm News are committed to providing its members and readers with the latest news and information on the COVID-19 pandemic. For news, updates and resources, visit https://www.michfb.com/MI/Coronavirus/. The page will be updated daily as more information becomes available.



Join us at this kickoff event to learn about the new Michigan Manure Hauler Certification Program!

Kickoff Event Details:

  • Free Event
  • Tuesday, March 31
  • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Located at AgroLiquid - 3055 M-21 St. Johns, MI 48879
  • Refreshments and lunch provided
  • In addition to information about the certification program, educational and regulatory updates will be included.
  • This event serves as an opportunity to learn about the new program. Training and certification is not completed at this event.

About the Michigan Manure Hauler Certification Program:

The Michigan Manure Hauler Certification Program is a voluntary training and certification designed for anyone who hauls and applies manure. Kickoff participants will learn about the details of the new certification program which has the following goals:

  • Prevent manure application problems.
  • Increase nutrient management plan implementation.
  • Demonstrate responsible manure application.
  • Increase the base level of manure management knowledge of all employees.


Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/michigan-manure-hauler-certification-program-kickoff-tickets-92944638917?fbclid=IwAR09u31kYJuU6xeHJaen21juNoTXGlTAueQa1mvFIqS_fwYwIIwFNxz1qWs

Kickoff Event Contact:

Tess Van Gorder, Michigan Farm Bureau (517) 323-6711 or [email protected]


Join us at this kickoff event to learn about the new Michigan Manure Hauler Certification Program!

State News


Marge Karker

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship offers three $1,000 awards to students enrolled in an agricultural program at Michigan State University. Applicants must be a dependent of a Farm Bureau member or have his/her own Farm Bureau membership in good standing.

Completed applications are due Oct. 1; forms and additional details are available online.

The Marge Karker Scholarship was established in the late 1960s to honor the former coordinator of MFB’s Women's Program. For 20 years she led Farm Bureau members in activities involving citizenship, health, education, legislation, public relations, safety and community improvement projects, all laying the groundwork for today’s Promotion and Education program.

Learn more about Karker here.

MFB staff contact: Amelia Miller , 517-679-5688

Michigan Farm Bureau’s Marge Karker Scholarship offers three $1,000 awards to students enrolled in an agricultural program at Michigan State University. Applicants must be a dependent of a Farm Bureau member or have his/her own Farm Bureau membership
Michigan Farm Bureau

Just because COVID’s sidelined the FARM Science Lab this fall doesn’t mean we can’t still boost students’ agricultural literacy. Michigan Farm Bureau is retooling programming and resources so our county Farm Bureaus can still share their agricultural expertise with teachers and students.

County Promotion & Education chairs should move fast to take advantage of cost-sharing opportunities for classroom outreach this fall. The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture is underwriting two cost-sharing options for helping you connect with local teachers.

  • Teacher Appreciation Care Packages ship directly to teachers and come with ag-accurate books; teacher guides; Michigan Ag Facts placemat; a small student gift and a treat for the teacher. Order now for $20 (half their value). Order by Sept. 4 for delivery in late September. Order by Oct. 1 for delivery in mid-October.
  • Farm Crate Monthly Classroom Kits for grades K-5 each feature a different monthly commodity theme, September through December. Each includes an ag-accurate book; Agriculture in the Classroom lesson resources; hands-on lesson and support materials for grades K-2 and 3-5; online extension activity; and a content-related gift or resource for the teacher. They’re $25 each (half their value) or order the full fall subscription and get the fourth month free ($75 total). Order by Oct. 1 to have the full subscription delivered.

Work with your P&E chair and county administrative manager to order through the Michigan Ag in the Classroom store subscription tab.

For more information, contact P&E Program Specialist Amelia Miller at 517-679-5688.

County Promotion & Education chairs should move fast to take advantage of cost-sharing opportunities for classroom outreach this fall. The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture is underwriting two cost-sharing options for helping you connect with local

In arguably the biggest maneuver yet to help ensure the health and safety of its members, Michigan Farm Bureau’s 101st annual meeting will take place largely online.

In an Aug. 27 memo to leaders across the Family of Companies, MFB President Carl Bednarski announced the board of directors “has made the tough decision to hold the 2020 State Annual Meeting in a hybrid-virtual format.

“Moving the meeting from a fully in-person experience to a virtual platform was our last choice,” Bednarski added, “but it will give us some unique opportunities to both reach more members and show our abilities to adapt to the current social position.”

The focus of the meeting this year will be essential business, as defined by the organization’s by-laws, and policy development. 

The meeting will convene virtually in three segments, beginning Nov. 4, 2020 and concluding Dec. 2, following this general outline:

NOV. 4 — Virtual State Annual Kick Off, to take place entirely online, allowing all MFB members to tune in and get updates from our organization’s state leaders:

  • President’s address
  • Rules Committee report
  • Credentials Committee report
  • CEO Report
  • Approval of the 2019 Annual Meeting minutes
  • Treasurer’s report

NOV. 9-19 — District Meetings will take place virtually or in person, based on COVID phase restrictions then in place for each district:

  • District Directors nominations and elections
  • Policy review
  • Delegate voting training

DEC. 2 — Business & Policy Development, to take place in person or virtually by district and based on COVID phase restrictions. MFB leadership and the State Policy Development Committee members will be in one location for the purpose of webcasting the proceedings.

  • Nomination and election of district, Young Farmer and P&E directors
  • Election of MFB President
  • Policy resolution discussion – reaffirmation style
  • Policy resolutions

Look for more details as they develop in Farm Gate and all your usual Farm Bureau communications channels.

“We appreciate your patience, support and above all, we appreciate your dedication to the organization,” Bednarski said.

In an Aug. 27 memo to leaders across the Family of Companies, MFB President Carl Bednarski announced the board of directors “has made the tough decision to hold the 2020 State Annual Meeting in a hybrid-virtual format.

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